Bend at Eye Level

“Bend at Eye Level” is a reference to “The City at Eye Level”. Since people outside Oregon may not know where Bend is, below is a map that shows the location of Bend in Oregon. Bend, OR (91,122 people in 2016) reminds me of Asheville, NC (89,121 people in 2016) because they have similar populations and are hip and expensive mountain cities with strong art, brewery and mountain biking scenes. As someone who has biked in both cities, Asheville is not as bike friendly as Bend. Since it rains more in Asheville, I would rather live in Bend.

I am writing about Bend because I was shocked by many things that I saw while biking throughout Bend for my first time during the Oregon Trails Summit. I will admit that I did not plan to write about Bend before arriving in Bend. My thought process quickly changed when I biked through my first roundabout in Bend. It felt similar to a Dutch protected bike intersection, which I wrote about in this post. As you can see in the below photo, cyclists have the option to act like a pedestrian through the roundabout by taking the bike off-ramp to access the sidewalk then using the crosswalks.

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Looking west on NW Galveston Ave at NW 14th St. Photo: Ray Atkinson.

Even though I could not find any signs with instructions at any of the roundabouts in Bend, I found the below tips on the City of Bend’s website. Thankfully, the tips are just suggestions and do not appear to be laws because I biked on the sidewalks and across the crosswalks to avoid biking with cars through the roundabout. According to the City of Bend’s tips, I was supposed to walk my bike on the sidewalks and across the crosswalks. While there likely is not enough space to separate cyclists and pedestrians on the sidewalks and crosswalks in Bend, this is how the protected bike intersections and bike lanes function in the Netherlands.

I asked several cyclists in Bend whether they act like a pedestrian or a car when they bike through the roundabout. All of them said they act like a car by taking the lane through the roundabout because acting like a pedestrian takes too long and motorists do not expect to see cyclists using the sidewalk or crosswalk. While the City of Bend recommends for cyclists to walk their bike on the sidewalk and crosswalk through the roundabout, I doubt cyclists will do this unless there is someone walking. I rarely saw anyone walking outside of Downtown Bend, so most of the roundabouts had no one walking through them.

I have only shown you a bike off-ramp, so below is a bike on-ramp at another Bend roundabout. While most of the bike on-ramps did not have tree limbs blocking the ramp, I wanted to show this photo so urban designers can see an example of what not to do. I was unable to use this on-ramp because tree limbs were blocking the ramp. I emailed the City of Bend to ask them to trim the tree so this issue can be resolved.

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Looking south on SW Colorado Ave and SW Simpson Ave. Photo: Ray Atkinson.

The below roundabout issue is harder to fix. While most of the bike off-ramps were installed to make it easy to exit the road and enter the sidewalk, the below bike off-ramp was not installed correctly. It is also missing the painted white dashes on the road, which indicate that cyclists can move into the travel lane. While the City of Bend has installed infrastructure to allow cyclists to act like a pedestrian through roundabouts, cyclists are not required to do this.

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Looking west on SW Simpson Ave at SW Colorado Ave. Photo: Ray Atkinson.

Since I enjoyed biking throughout Bend and know people are not perfect, I wanted to share a photo of art installed at a roundabout. All of the roundabouts that I biked through had art installed in them. Here is a map that shows all 24 roundabouts that have art in them. The art produced great placemaking!

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Looking northwest at the SW Simpson Ave at SW Colorado Ave roundabout. Photo: Ray Atkinson.

I want to write more and have other photos to share, but believe this is a good stopping point for tonight. I plan to write more and add more photos another day. Thanks for reading my blog!

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Can Artistic Bike Racks Meet Rigorous Design Standards?

Since I doubt the standard approach to bicycle planning will encourage more people to bike to Clackamas Community College (CCC), I have been thinking of creative ways to entice people to bike. While I could install standard bike racks, this will not create the visual shock value I am seeking. CCC has a Welding Technology Program with teachers that are American Welding Society-certified professionals, so I am partnering with welding teachers to have them teach their students how to weld artistic bike racks. While I am excited about this partnership, I need to be cautious about how the artistic bike racks are designed. This is a major reason why most bike planners only install standard bike racks. Can artistic bike racks meet rigorous design standards?

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Artistic bike rack being welded. Source: StarHerald.com

The main welding teacher has expressed excitement to have a real-world project for their students to work on. He invited me to present my idea to everyone in the Manufacturing Department at the October department meeting. Since my position is not located in the Manufacturing Department, I feel honored to help break down silos by presenting to a different campus department. While I want to give the welding teachers and their students full artistic freedom, I need to ensure the artistic bike racks meet rigorous design standards. I have not worked with welding teachers and students before and have no welding experience, so I am curious to learn how feasible this process is. I am thankful the Manufacturing Department is open to considering my idea.

Since this is a perfect opportunity to include placemaking, I plan to suggest placemaking ideas be included in the artistic bike rack designs. Placemaking could include showing pride in CCC or Oregon City. CCC’s main campus is located in Oregon City, which has a rich history because it is the End of the Oregon Trail. If possible, I want to include this history in the artistic bike rack designs. The below artistic bike rack on the Trolley Trail in Milwaukie, OR is an example of placemaking because the bike rack was designed to showcase the Trolley Trail’s history.

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Artistic bike rack using placemaking in Milwaukie, OR. Source: OregonLive.com

You may be wondering why I feel it is so important to create artistic bike racks and have welding students create them. Since I feel it is challenging in an American suburb to entice people to try biking, I feel it is important to create a visual shock value. Standard bike racks cannot create this visual shock value. I chose to have welding students instead of an off-campus bike parking company create the artistic bike racks because I assume the students will want to use the bike racks that they create and show them off to their family and friends. While an off-campus bike parking company is more familiar with bike rack design standards, their employees will not use the bike racks. Plus, I hope to save CCC money by producing the artistic bike racks on campus.

Since creating artistic bike racks are not free, I am currently applying for a grant that does not require a financial match. Grant winners will be announced on November 19, 2018. What do you think of my idea?

Westside and Downtown Cleveland at Eye Level

“Cleveland at Eye Level” is a reference to “The City at Eye Level”. While my parents and sister were nervous about me exploring Cleveland without knowing how safe the neighborhoods are, I feel accomplished in my goal of exploring tourist and non-tourist areas of Cleveland. The following quote from my dad reinforces this feeling.

You explored more of Cleveland in two days than I explored in twenty years. -Dad

My mom and dad met at Cleveland State University so they both know Cleveland. However, my dad informed me that he didn’t explore as many of Cleveland’s ethnically diverse neighborhoods as I did. Since I believe some White people aren’t even willing to step into non-White neighborhoods, I feel good hearing that my dad explored some of Cleveland’s racially and ethnically diverse neighborhoods.

Another of my goals was to explore diverse neighborhoods and not be limited to White neighborhoods. Due to this goal, I probably explored more of Cleveland than most locals and tourists will ever explore. In case you aren’t familiar with how racially segregated Cleveland is, see the below racial dot map. My uncle, who lives in Rocky River (suburb of Cleveland), told me he thinks Cleveland is more racially segregated than DC.

Since Cleveland is so racially segregated, I felt hopeful when I saw the below tile in Settlers’ Landing at the Unity Walk, which was constructed in 1996 for Cleveland’s Bicentennial Celebration. I saw Cleveland’s Unity Walk on New Year’s Eve, which was my last evening in Cleveland. I had already walked and ridden transit through diverse neighborhoods in the westside, downtown and eastside so seeing the Unity Walk felt like the perfect way for me to close out 2016. Seeing how diverse communities in Cleveland came together to build the Unity Walk was just what I needed after a tough 2016.

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Cleveland’s Unity Walk

I hope I have done a good job providing you with some background about Cleveland before showing you what I found in Cleveland’s diverse neighborhoods. I also want to share what I was thinking when taking the photos. While I want to improve my urban design and architecture skills, I find it challenging to understand whether the urban design and architecture of the buildings are good or bad so I didn’t focus much on building design. I actually almost failed an entry-level urban design course at UNC Charlotte because I don’t have an eye for building design. Devoting time and energy to pressuring the Student Government Association at UNC Charlotte to be more transparent didn’t help me improve my grade in the urban design course.

Instead of focusing on building design, I focused on wayfinding, artistic displays, sustainable infrastructure, public gathering places, and historic attractions. I’m hoping to use what I found for my advocacy and planning work. Without further delay, I chose to write about my journey through Cleveland by focusing on the westside then downtown then eastside. I took almost 200 photos. In order to keep this post short enough, I’m going to select my favorite photos.

Westside of Cleveland

Gordon Square Arts District

My Airbnb was in the Gordon Square Arts District so I started walking from my Airbnb. As you look at my photos, I want you to ask yourself “could I have seen that if I was driving?” The answer is likely no. This is why I enjoy walking instead of driving when I’m not in a rush. The below photo shows the first example of something I could only see by exploring Cleveland at eye level.

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EcoVillage

It’s amazing what I found when I looked down. The below photo shows neighborhood identity in the EcoVillage. I love seeing when neighborhoods try to be unique!

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Here is another example of neighborhood identity in the EcoVillage. When I see neighborhood signs like this, I appreciate that there is a strong community. On the other hand, I also ask myself how many motorists see the neighborhood sign or even know they are in a new neighborhood? I assume most motorists are too busy trying to go fast so they don’t take the time to enjoy the neighborhood they are traveling through. While I’m okay with interstate speeds being fast, I wish speed limits on all non-interstate roads were lowered so people could enjoy being in neighborhoods instead of trying to travel as quickly as possible through them.

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I guess if motorists can’t see the previous two neighborhood identity markers, maybe they can see the below mural.

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Ohio City

Ohio City has many artsy things to see. Correct me if I’m assuming too much. I assume motorists wouldn’t see many of the following things because they would be too busy focusing on the road and complaining about traffic congestion.

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Downtown Cleveland

As I entered Downtown Cleveland, I felt jealous of how wide the multi-use path is on the Hope Memorial Bridge. I wish the multi-use path on Portland’s Hawthorne Bridge was this wide!

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As a geographer and planner, I love good wayfinding. After crossing Hope Memorial Bridge, I saw a sign for “Bike Rack” so followed it. I found more “Bike Rack” signs at every turn so I was able to follow the signs all the way to the Bike Rack, which is located at Quicken Loans Arena. You may be surprised by how many wayfinding signs don’t actually direct you all the way to where you are going. I was expecting to see just simple bike racks. Instead, I found the below secure bike room. Secure bike rooms are common in Portland, but this is Cleveland. Cleveland isn’t supposed to have a strong bike culture!

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The Bike Rack even has repair services!

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Even though my cousin, who grew up in Rocky River (suburb of Cleveland), told me about the pedestrian street on East 4th Street before I could be surprised by it, I was still excited to see it. While it’s very short compared to many pedestrian streets I explored in Europe, I was happy to see Cleveland trying to prioritize pedestrians.

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I also enjoyed seeing people interact at Public Square. The below ice skating rink is located in Public Square. Since many couples were holding hands, I missed holding hands with Catherine.

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I’m still trying to figure out why these birds are in Public Square. I saw people taking photos with the birds. However, when I asked them about the birds they didn’t know why the birds are in Public Square. Why take a photo with something you have no idea what the background story is?

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The below group of cyclists meeting in Public Square reminded me of the group rides I did in Portland. I saw about 100 cyclists take control of the right lane near Quicken Loans Arena about an hour later so the group likely expanded. Since I don’t think of Cleveland when I think of bike cities, I was impressed seeing this bike culture.

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Warehouse District

My excitement about Cleveland’s bike culture took an emotional hit when I saw this bike parking in the Warehouse District. I didn’t see any bikes parked here so is this supposed to be a bike rack or just a barrier to keep motorists from parking on the sidewalk?

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Downtown Cleveland was like an emotional roller coaster for me. After being depressed by the badly designed bike parking, I got excited by Small Box, which is located in the Warehouse District. Small Box has three retail stores created using upcycled shipping containers.

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As the below photo, which I took at Public Square, shows, Cleveland has the same problem as Portland with motorists using the “bus only” lane. The rumble strip doesn’t stop motorists from using the “bus only” lane.

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To my amazement, the “bus only” lane worked just a block east of Public Square. I still would have preferred seeing a more permanent barrier than just a rumble strip.

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Wow! I walked several miles through westside neighborhoods and downtown on Friday afternoon and evening. I haven’t started to share about what I saw walking through eastside neighborhoods on Saturday morning and afternoon. This post is getting long so I wrote a 3rd and final post about Cleveland’s eastside neighborhoods.

Future Trips

My quick Cleveland solo trip helped me better understand what I can feasibly do during my weekends off from work. During grad school, I had to do homework during the weekend so couldn’t take the whole weekend off. I now have the freedom to explore other cities like Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York City, Boston, Montreal, Quebec City, Toronto, Indianapolis, Chicago, New Orleans, Memphis, Minneapolis, and many other cities. Thankfully, I can reach most of these cities using Amtrak. If I have limited time, I can always fly. Since it’s winter, I’m currently focusing on warmer cities where I don’t have to worry about the bike lanes and trails not being plowed.