Ray’s Professional Growth From 1st Full-Time, Permanent Job

As I update my resume and cover letter and prepare for job interviews, I have been reflecting on my professional growth from my 1st full-time, permanent job as the Bikeshare Planner at MetroBike, LLC. This job was an amazing experience. It helped prepare me for my next job because I now have more hands-on experience coordinating and leading office and site meetings with clients and public and private stakeholders. I was effectively able to listen to client and stakeholder concerns and find feasible ways to resolve their concerns.

I have seven years of experience learning and using ArcGIS. Since ArcGIS is expensive, I was asked to learn QGIS, which is free and open-source. I quickly self-taught QGIS and was able to provide my clients with professional maps, which they appreciated. My clients also thanked me for quickly incorporating their requested map edits. None of the maps have been publicly released yet, so I can’t share them with you.

QGIS wasn’t the only free and open-source software that I self-taught during my last job. Even though I learned Photoshop during graduate school at Portland State University, I was asked to learn Paint.NET so I could create bikeshare station footprint photos and aerials. Since I shared the below footprint photo of a planned Capital Bikeshare station at Gravelly Point to get public feedback, I can share it with you.

Gravelly Point Footprint3

Footprint photo of planned Capital Bikeshare station at Gravelly Point

Public speaking was a crucial component of my job. While I still get nervous when presenting, I was pleasantly surprised how much my public speaking skills improved during this job. I was able to remain calm and focused during presentations. I thoroughly enjoyed engaging with the public when presenting to civic associations in Arlington. In addition, my former boss and I presented at the 2017 North American Bikeshare Association Conference in Montreal. As the below photo shows, I also presented the Fiscal Year 2017 Capital Bikeshare update to the Arlington Bicycle Advisory Committee.

I could share many other ways that I experienced professional growth, but I’m trying to write more concisely. I’m excited to see what my next job is and my continued professional growth.

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Ray’s Crash Course in Respectability Politics

The power of social media, especially Facebook, helped me learn about respectability politics. I had never heard of respectability politics before today. As my below Facebook post shows, I thought I was helping to improve bike advocacy efforts by policing badly behaved cyclists.

For example, I saw a cyclist go through every stoplight on Fairfax Drive in Arlington, VA last Wednesday during afternoon rush hour. Since I’m tired of hearing well behaved cyclists and motorists tell me how badly behaved cyclists are ruining the image of all cyclists, I tried to chase down the badly behaved cyclist and tell him to stop breaking the law.

While I wasn’t able to catch up with the badly behaved cyclist, I’m thankful I posted this experience on social media. My friends were able to educate me about respectability politics and why it doesn’t work. Even though I was convinced I was doing the right thing by policing badly behaved cyclists, I’m thankful my friends stuck to their reasoning and waited patiently for me to show them that I understood their viewpoint. It took a few days for me to stop arguing my viewpoint and finally understand their viewpoint. Now I can share their reasoning with others that may not fully understand respectability politics.

In case you haven’t heard of it before, respectability politics “refers to attempts by marginalized groups to police their own members and show their social values as being continuous, and compatible, with mainstream values rather than challenging the mainstream for what they see as its failure to accept difference.” Instead of policing cyclists, my friends suggested I encourage people to do the right thing. As Zvi Leve, who is an experienced cyclist living in Montreal, wrote, “I find that positive reinforcement is a far more effective strategy to encourage people to ‘do the right thing’.” Zvi also shared the following CityLab article, which discusses Sweden’s Vision Zero approach to education and enforcement.

Vision Zero Enforcement

Source: CityLab

Speaking of Vision Zero, I’m currently working with GGWash‘s staff to publish my next blog post about why Sustainable Safety, which is the Dutch alternative to Vision Zero, is more effective than Vision Zero.