Making a difference on the Oregon City Transportation Advisory Committee

I serve on several advisory committees throughout the Portland and Charlotte regions through my job and as a volunteer. Yes, I still serve on the Advisory Council for Sustain Charlotte’s Transportation Choices Alliance even though I no longer live in Charlotte. While most of the committee members that I serve with understand their important role and how to make a difference, some of my fellow Oregon City Transportation Advisory Committee (TAC) members have struggled with this.

In case they read my blog, I want to give them hope for how they can make a difference on our committee. Since we volunteer on the TAC and some of my fellow volunteers feel the City Commission is the only group that can make a difference, I hope this post shows them and other volunteers that it is possible to make a difference even when you have limited voting power.

Oregon City Mayor Dan Holladay appointed me to my first three-year term on the TAC in January 2019. Since I have lived in Oregon City for less than a year, I am still surprised that I was the only new candidate that was appointed to the TAC. Even though there were three open seats and four candidates, an incumbent and I were the only candidates appointed to the TAC. The remaining open seat and another open seat were filled in March 2019. I got to interview the candidates and vote on who would fill the seats. This was an awesome experience!

Even though all of the other TAC members are much older than me (some of them could be my grandpa), I am the only transportation professional and car-free member so the other members and Oregon City staff have expressed appreciation for my valuable experience. Since the older members have lived and worked through decades of Oregon City’s rich history, they have their own valuable experience to share with me. As a millennial, it feels weird to share that older people can learn from my experience when they have lived and worked much longer than me.

In addition to helping Oregon City and Clackamas County prepare for electric-assist dockless bikeshare and scootershare expanding from Portland, I am making a difference on the Oregon City TAC through the following two topics.

Canemah Family Friendly Route

While the route signs and markings have already been ordered, which means I was too late to make changes, Oregon City staff told the TAC that the Canemah Family Friendly Route is the first pilot project and they are open to making changes in the future. In order to explain my proposed change, focus on the bike symbol in the two below signs. Since I want Oregon City’s Family Friendly Route to be as successful as Portland’s Neighborhood Greenway, I feel the Family Friendly Route’s bike symbol needs to show the target audience of relaxed, family biking. The current bike symbol shows a racing or training cyclist because the cyclist is leaning over and looks stressed to beat their personal record time.

In contrast, the bike symbol on Portland’s Neighborhood Greenway shows a relaxed cyclist because the cyclist is sitting more upright. This is how I see a family biking together because they are not trying stressed to beat their personal record time. Do you see the difference between the two bike symbols?

Family Friendly Route Sign

Oregon City’s Family Friendly Route Sign

Portland Neighborhood Greenway Sign

Portland’s Neighborhood Greenway Sign

Crash Instead of Accident

While I was nervous to publicly call out Oregon City staff for saying “accident” instead of “crash” when referring to a deadly pedestrian crash involving a truck in Oregon City, staff thanked me for correcting them and explaining why they should say “crash” instead of “accident”. The staff even said they will try to use “crash” in the future. The reason why this is important is calling it an accident assumes no one, including the government for design issues, was at fault and nothing can be done to prevent the crash. Since the crash could have been prevented, it needs to be called a crash instead of an accident.

Future Blog Posts

As I stated in my previous post, my one-year work anniversary at Clackamas Community College is in June and I will have been back in Oregon for a year in June. I plan to write a post about how my one-year goals went and what my two-year goals are. Since my North Carolina-based family is planning a July 4-14 vacation with me to visit my grandmas and other relatives in Ohio and Pennsylvania, I plan to write a post about this.

Achieving Busy Schedule In 2018

I’m about three months into my job search. As 2017 ends tonight and 2018 begins, I’ve been thinking about my new year’s resolution. Since a busy schedule helped me feel good when I was working earlier this year and interviewers have been asking what I’ve been doing since I lost my job, my new year’s resolution is to achieve a busy schedule again. While it’s tougher for me to have a busy schedule when I’m not working a full-time job, I’m determined to find a way to achieve a busy schedule again regardless of having a full-time job.

As a planner, I prefer to create a plan for how I’m going to achieve something rather than hope it happens. My existing volunteer work is a good starting point. One of the many things I love about the Washington, DC region is how many opportunities I have to get involved in exciting projects. As this post shows, I have been helping the Capital Trails Coalition by serving on its Analytics Working Group. Staff at the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy (RTC) and Washington Area Bicyclist Association (WABA), who work together on the Capital Trails Coalition, have told me they are stretched thin. I’ve been offering to help them more than just at monthly meetings, so I’m hopeful to plug into a cool project.

I have been writing blog posts for Greater Greater Washington (GGWash). I’m currently in the process of writing two more posts for GGWash. One post is about State of Place’s walkability study for the Lee Highway Alliance. The other post is about dockless bikeshare in Washington, DC.

As the Transportation Issues Chair for the Mount Vernon Group of the Sierra Club, I’ve been advocating for the Sierra Club’s viewpoint on local, regional, and state transportation issues. I’m also running uncontested for a seat on the Mount Vernon Group’s Executive Committee.

After describing some of my volunteer work and realizing I need to make time for my job search, I’m asking myself whether I should be trying to have a busier volunteer schedule or acknowledge that I’m doing plenty to stay busy during my job search. What do you think?